From Short Fiction

Read by the Author: ‘Messages’ by Meadhbh Ní Eadhra

Meadhbh Ní Eadhra reads an excerpt from ‘Messages’, her short story in Issue Ten. Meadhbh Ní Eadhra is from Galway in the West of Ireland. She writes in Irish and English and has published three award-winning novels for young people, Rua, Fáinne Fí Fífí and Faye. She won the Moth Short Story Prize in 2013 and has received numerous national Oireachtas literary…

Writing ‘Above It All’ / Angela Graham

In order to consider the germination of my story I’d like to refer to Dan Coxon’s online piece on this site On Writing ‘Sound of the Riverbed’, in which he assesses the worth of the adage, ‘Write what you know’. He concludes: Perhaps I was wrong to reject Mark Twain’s ‘Write what you know’. Perhaps…

Read by the Author: ‘Badgerface’ by Lucie McKnight Hardy

Lucie McKnight Hardy reads an extract from ‘Badgerface’ featured in Issue Ten of The Lonely Crowd.  Lucie McKnight Hardy grew up in West Wales, and is a Welsh speaker. She has various pieces of short fiction published or forthcoming in print and online, and her debut novel, Water Shall Refuse Them, will be published by…

Writing ‘Soft to Good, Heavy in Places’ Grahame Williams

I began this story last October, on the day and date the story takes place, in the town in which the story takes place, sat in the passenger seat while my brother drove us home from our grandfather’s funeral. My girlfriend sat in the back, five months pregnant with our first child, and we listened…

On Being Fallow / Arnold Thomas Fanning

Time goes by and I do not write. Despite Kafka’s warning – “A non-writing writer is a monster courting insanity”[*] – I do not fret, I do not let this sit heavy upon me. Rather, this period of time, to outward appearances so unproductive, is a time without worry, a time of lightness indeed, an unburdened…

Writing ‘Leave The Light On For Me’ / Jane Fraser

‘Leave The Light On For Me’ is one of twenty-three stories that comprise a short fiction collection entitled The South Westerlies that I submitted for my PhD thesis in 2017. The collection is an attempt to know my place of Gower. All the stories are set here where I live, work and write, in the…

Writing ‘Brave Girl’ / Kathleen MacMahon

It’s a funny thing how different a short story is to a novel. You’d thing they’d be much the same to write, if not to read. The writer, after all, would set to work with the same basic tools, using the same skills. You’d be facing the same challenges, only on a different scale, or…

READ BY THE AUTHOR: ‘Sound of the Riverbed’ by Dan Coxon

Dan Coxon reads ‘Sound of the Riverbed’ from Issue Nine of The Lonely Crowd. Dan Coxon edited the award-winning anthology Being Dad (Best Anthology, Saboteur Awards 2016) and is a Contributing Editor at The Lonely Crowd. His writing has appeared in Salon, Popshot, The Lonely Crowd, Open Pen, Wales Arts Review, Gutter, The Portland Review and Unthology…

‘Dazzling the Gods’ by Tom Vowler

Even the bluebottles have succumbed. Half a dozen, upended on the window sill, legs sculling the air in attempts to right themselves. The room a kiln, sun livid as it seethes onto the glass, braising him in a broth of wretchedness. People comparing it to a time before all this, when there were standpipes in…

‘Walt’ / Louise Warren

Issue 9 of The Lonely Crowd features three new poems from Louise Warren, including ‘Walt’, which she discusses here. Don’t miss Louise reading these poems at our London event this Thursday. I have always loved the films of Walt Disney, especially the earlier ones. Fantasia, Pinocchio, the original One Hundred and One Dalmatians with its hand…

On Writing ‘Sound of the Riverbed’ / Dan Coxon

‘Write what you know.’ For many years it was advice that I tried to follow, a mantra so prevalent in creative writing teaching that it surely couldn’t be wrong. Except, of course, that it is. Or not wrong exactly, but misguided, and limited, and – more importantly – limiting. Taken to its logical conclusion, ‘Write…

On Writing ‘Detroit’ / Anne Hayden

When I first started writing short stories a few years ago, it didn’t take long for a pattern to emerge: I kept setting them in the dead of night. It shouldn’t have been a surprise, I’m no stranger to the small hours. I’ve spent most of my professional life working the evening shift in newsrooms,…