From Fiction

Swansea Readings from The Lonely Crowd

We’ll be upstairs at Noah’s Yard from 730pm tomorrow (08/11/07) with an incredible line-up of writers. Admission Free. Copies of our new issue will be on sale at the event, alongside a selection of older ones. (Note: there will be an intermission half-way through the night). The Lonely Crowd in Swansea are:  Cath Barton is an…

ONLINE FICTION: ‘Why, Molly?’ by Tanya Farrelly

Molly stands in the doorway, portfolio clutched beneath one arm, and watches Jake clear the snow from the driveway. Head bowed in concentration, he hasn’t seen her come out of the house. The shovel scrapes on the tarmac and he tosses another pile of dirty snow onto the lawn. Molly wishes he wouldn’t do that.…

On Writing ‘Yesterday’s Tomorrow’ – Jessica Bonder

Jessica Bonder is an American fiction writer and actor. She has previously published works in STORGY Magazine, The Bohemyth, Vending Machine Press, The Fiction Pool, Split Lip Magazine and Unbroken Journal. Her short story ‘Not Today’ won first place in STORGY’s 2015 Short Story Contest, judged by author Paul McVeigh. She holds a BA in English and Art History from the University of Pennsylvania. She lives in New Jersey. http://www.jessicabonder.com. Tweet her @jessbonder.

How I Wrote ‘rain-mongrel’ – David Butler

Some years ago, I put together an experimental story entitled ‘Dublin Symphony’. A rather dark urban fantasy, it consisted of four movements: ‘Skin’; ‘rain-mongrel’; ‘Voices’; ‘The Sisters’. Each had its own narrative logic, its own cohesion, its own tempo. The structure, such as it was, was loosely musical, or was intended to be. I was…

How I Wrote ‘Morning Glory’ – Fiona O’Connor

Fiona O’Connor, a former Hennessy Short Story Award Prize winner. Recently shortlisted for a Luke Bitmead Award for her novel, The Group, winner of Galway Rape Crisis Centre/Cuirt Festival Prize 2016, Kilburn Literature Festival Short Story Prize 2015, Shortlisted for Mslexia First Novel Award, 2015, Fish, Ambit, Asham Short Story Awards 2014, Highly Commended in The London Short Story Prize 2014. Regular contributor to The Irish Times Books Section.

How I Wrote ‘Gone’ – James Lawless

James Lawless discusses his short story, ‘Gone’, featured in Issue Seven of The Lonely Crowd. My story ‘Gone’ is about transience, about an old world and a new world, the monochrome and homogenous town of my mother’s generation and the multiethnic, modern metropolis of the present day as captured in the microcosm of a city…

Who I talk about when I talk about Mansfield – Rachel J. Fenton

Rachel J. Fenton discusses her short story ‘Katherine Mansfield’s Sheets’ – featured in Issue Seven of The Lonely Crowd. The title of my Story “Katherine Mansfield’s Sheets” makes bold its reference to the most revered of New Zealand’s short story writers. The style, too, though my own, conveys something of Mansfield’s. But it wasn’t until…

How I Wrote ‘Nowadays’ – Durre Shahwar

‘Nowadays’ was written after the European referendum, the result of which, left most of us shocked, to say the least. Suddenly the questions of national identity, belonging and home were the forefront of every conversation more so than before. I had always felt a sense of belonging in Wales, and in many ways, I still…

Introduction to Issue Seven – Valerie Sirr

Valerie Sirr is the Guest Editor of Fiction in Issue Seven of The Lonely Crowd. In my submission call for short fiction I asked for stories that are ‘instinctive, grown and shaped through an intense focus of perception and language’. The writers included here demonstrate those qualities of a close attentiveness to experience and a…

On ‘The One That Feels Good’ – Sean Tanner

There is nothing quite like being asked about your writing to make a writer feel quite so writerly. Which is funny, because the last time I was asked, the best I could manage was a string of artful ‘ahhhs,’ ‘ehhhs’ and, of course, the informative ‘ummms.’ You’d think, given the amount of time I spend…