From Poetry

On writing ‘4am’ & ‘Sleet’ – Marc Hamer

As I sit here writing at my kitchen table, a ladybird is crawling on my leg. I accidentally bring a lot of wildlife home from my work, beetles and spiders, the occasional grasshopper under my collar, ants in the creases of my work trousers or fallen into my boots. The ladybird on my knee is…

Philip Gross – thinking about about-ness

Philip Gross is a poet, librettist and writer for children. He won the T.S. Eliot Prize 2009 with The Water Table, and Wales Book of The Year 2010 with I Spy Pinhole Eye. Deep Field dealt with his Estonian refugee father’s final years and loss of language, an exploration into our place in the world broadened steadily through later collections, most recently A Bright Acoustic (2017). Recently liberated from 25 years of academic life, he is an insatiable collaborator across art forms, e.g. with artist Valerie Coffin Price on A Fold in the River, and with composer Benjamin Frank Vaughan on The King in the Car Park, a cantata about the re-discovery of Richard III, performed in Leicester Cathedral.

Read by the Author: ‘How He Lay’ by Philip Gross

Philip Gross is a poet, librettist and writer for children. He won the T.S. Eliot Prize 2009 with The Water Table, and Wales Book of The Year 2010 with I Spy Pinhole Eye. Deep Field dealt with his Estonian refugee father’s final years and loss of language, an exploration into our place in the world broadened steadily through later collections, most recently A Bright Acoustic (2017). Recently liberated from 25 years of academic life, he is an insatiable collaborator across art forms, e.g. with artist Valerie Coffin Price on A Fold in the River, and with composer Benjamin Frank Vaughan on The King in the Car Park, a cantata about the re-discovery of Richard III, performed in Leicester Cathedral.

Swansea Readings from The Lonely Crowd

We’ll be upstairs at Noah’s Yard from 730pm tomorrow (08/11/07) with an incredible line-up of writers. Admission Free. Copies of our new issue will be on sale at the event, alongside a selection of older ones. (Note: there will be an intermission half-way through the night). The Lonely Crowd in Swansea are:  Cath Barton is an…

‘Kepler 452B’ by Medbh McGuckian

Medbh McGuckian was born in 1950 in Belfast where she continues to live. She has been Writer-in-Residence at Queen’s University, Belfast, the University of Ulster, Coleraine, and Trinity College, Dublin, and was Visiting Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. Among the prizes she has won are England’s National Poetry Competition, The Cheltenham Award, The Rooney Prize, the Bass Ireland Award for Literature, the Denis Devlin Award, the Alice Hunt Bartlett Prize, and, in 2002, The Forward Prize for Best Poem. She received the American Ireland Fund Literary Award in 1998. She won the Forward Prize for Best Poem for ‘She Is in the Past, She Has This Grace’. Her latest collection is Blaris Moor. Medbh McGuckian is a member of Aosdána.

‘Revolutionary Road’ by Charlie Baylis

Charlie Baylis reads his poem ‘Revolutionary Road’ from Issue Seven of The Lonely Crowd. Revolutionary Road by Charlie Baylis on Vimeo. Written & Performed by Charlie Baylis Directed by Mark Campbell-Garrity Cinematography by Fatosh Olgacher

November: Cardiff & Swansea Events

We’ve two free events coming up in November, featuring a host of literary talent from Wales and beyond: Philip Gross Jenn Ashworth, Jo Mazelis, Robert Minhinnick, John Goodby, Jane Lovell, Tony Curtis, Stephen Payne, Christopher Cornwell, Cath Barton, KM Elkes, Jane Fraser, Chris Hall, Marc Hamer & Hugh Doyle.

‘Samhain’ by Ingrid Casey

On the Wednesday before Samhain, I am making a typo in the IM to my besto about the summer of 1816, the summer of no sun, I say summer of no sin, is there such a thing, we emojicate, jocular, of course not, but Shelley’s summer, as I’d been reading over the clouds of gothic…

‘What Did You Do in the War, Dad?’ Tony Curtis

In Issue Five, we featured ‘Pro Patria’, Tony Curtis’s moving poem to his father. Here Curtis discusses the motivations and story behind the poem, which you can now also read online.  What had my father, Leslie Thomas Curtis, done in the war? There is a time in one’s life when unanswered questions, perhaps previously unformed questions come to mind and will not leave. The structured formulae of tv programmes such as Who Do You Think You Are? encourages a delving into the past of families and, aided by pretty straightforward computer skills, it seems as if many of those perplexing…