From Criticism

Writing ‘Bottle Gardens’ / Paul Whyte

Paul Whyte discusses his short story, ‘Bottle Gardens’, featured in Issue Ten of The Lonely Crowd. I’ve lived with a relatively severe anxiety disorder for most of my life. It’s a part of who I am, and that’s ok, over the years I’ve come to accept it. Thankfully, I seem to be managing it pretty well…

Writing ‘Above It All’ / Angela Graham

In order to consider the germination of my story I’d like to refer to Dan Coxon’s online piece on this site On Writing ‘Sound of the Riverbed’, in which he assesses the worth of the adage, ‘Write what you know’. He concludes: Perhaps I was wrong to reject Mark Twain’s ‘Write what you know’. Perhaps…

On Weird and Wonderful Wales / Writing Ghosts: Tracey Rhys

Tracey Rhys discusses her poem ‘Telling Secrets to the Walls’, published in Issue Ten of The Lonely Crowd. The accompanying sketches are by the artist Pete Fowler. Last year, I was lucky enough to be chosen to participate in the Weird and Wonderful Wales project, a joint creative venture between Literature Wales, Cadw and the illustrator Pete…

Read by the Author: Three Poems / Angela T. Carr

Angela T. Carr reads three poems from Issue Ten of The Lonely Crowd: ‘At the Heart of Every Stone a Bird’, ‘Angel’ & ‘Quadratic Love Song’. Angela T. Carr’s debut collection How To Lose Your Home & Save Your Life won the Cork Literary Review Poetry Manuscript Competition in 2013. Her work is published in journals in the UK, Ireland and the US, and has…

Writing ‘Soft to Good, Heavy in Places’ Grahame Williams

I began this story last October, on the day and date the story takes place, in the town in which the story takes place, sat in the passenger seat while my brother drove us home from our grandfather’s funeral. My girlfriend sat in the back, five months pregnant with our first child, and we listened…

An Interview with Christopher Meredith / Glyn Edwards

Christopher Meredith is the award-winning author of four novels and three collections of poetry, and also translates Welsh to English. His collection of short stories Brief Lives was published by Seren this summer. Glyn Edwards: How long did it take you to assemble the stories that comprise Brief Lives? Christopher Meredith: The final process of writing the…

Getting Lost: On Root and Other Poems / Angela T. Carr

‘To enter a wood is to pass into a different world in which we are transformed. It is no accident that in Shakespeare’s comedies, people go into the greenwood to grow, learn and change. It is where you travel to find yourself, paradoxically, by getting lost.’ Roger Deakin, Wildwood: A Journey Through Trees (Hugo Hamilton,…

READ BY THE AUTHOR: Three Poems by Patrick Jones

Patrick Jones reads three new poems from Issue Ten of The Lonely Crowd: ‘Fucking Echoes’, ‘To Be Or Not’ & ‘When’.  Patrick Jones’ published work includes The Guerilla Tapestry (1995), The Protest Of Discipline (1996), Detritus (1997), Mute Communion (1997), Commemoration and Amnesia (Big Noise Productions, 1999), Fuse (Parthian Books, 2001), Against (2003), Darkness is where the stars are (Cinnamon Press, 2008), Tongues for a Stammering Time (Anhrefn Records, 2009), The Aspirations of Poverty (Red poets,…

On Being Fallow / Arnold Thomas Fanning

Time goes by and I do not write. Despite Kafka’s warning – “A non-writing writer is a monster courting insanity”[*] – I do not fret, I do not let this sit heavy upon me. Rather, this period of time, to outward appearances so unproductive, is a time without worry, a time of lightness indeed, an unburdened…

Writing ‘Leave The Light On For Me’ / Jane Fraser

‘Leave The Light On For Me’ is one of twenty-three stories that comprise a short fiction collection entitled The South Westerlies that I submitted for my PhD thesis in 2017. The collection is an attempt to know my place of Gower. All the stories are set here where I live, work and write, in the…

Writing ‘Brave Girl’ / Kathleen MacMahon

It’s a funny thing how different a short story is to a novel. You’d thing they’d be much the same to write, if not to read. The writer, after all, would set to work with the same basic tools, using the same skills. You’d be facing the same challenges, only on a different scale, or…